What Happened To Pub Rock # 4

It is to be appreciated at the time a singer who seems to have long been forgotten. Frankie Miller is a Glasgow born Scottish singer-songwriter. In his younger days he played football in several youth teams and he was always addicted to football. Probaly inherited from his maternal grandfather Archie Kyle who was one of the first Catholic football players signed to Glasgow Rangers FD.

Grown up with the music of Ray Charles, Little Richard and Elvis Presley he wrote his first song at the age of 12. I can’t change it was later recorded by Ray Charles. He formed his first band after he went to London with Robin Trower, the former guitar player of Procul Harum. Later in 1972 he recorded his first own album Once In A Blue Moon which is known as one of the earliest examples of pub rock. It is also a very good example of what pub rock means. A mighty voice backed up with excellent musicians playing fantastic songs. On this record he was supported from the legendary Brinsley Schwarz – also so called veterans of pub rock. Though the album received very good reviews, it was not a success. A few years later he sung together with Phil Lynott a duet on another great song from Thin Lizzy – Still In Love With You.

His second record was produced by Allen Touissaint in Atlanta. For me it was a little overproduced and his dominate voice was filled up with too much arrangements. He returned a few year later with another classical album. On The Rock to classic R & B and soul. And really, this album is a rock. A lot of great songs played relaxed. I just found these records again while I was thinking how to continue this series. Later in 1978 he had his only chartbreaker with Darlin’. Let’s finish with a statement by Rod Stewart: ‘He was the only white singer to have a tear to his eye’

From Once In A Blue Moon:
Frankie Miller –  I Can’t Change It
Frankie Miller – The Rules Of The Game (Demo)

From The Rock:
Frankie Miller – Drunken Nights In The City
Frankie Miller – The Rock

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “What Happened To Pub Rock # 4

  1. Not at all familiar with Frankie Miller, apart from his dreadful single from the late 1970s, Darlin. These tracks, though, are good.
    George

  2. He also did the dreadful Caledonia
    But these two songs apart he has a great voice, Saw him live ince – superb
    Sadly has never fully recovered from a brain haemorrhage in the early 90s

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s